Advanced Neuroimaging

– a collaboration involving several departments at the Haukeland University Hospital and three faculties at the University of Bergen

Our Projects

News

The aim of the MMIV advanced neuroimaging project is to apply quantitative imaging and interactive visualization in studies of the human central nervous system. Deep learning is a core activity in all projects associated with the MMIV advanced neuroimaging project.

Clinical neuroradiological reading explores differential diagnosis, primarily by describing morphological abnormalities, including large vessel mapping. Assessments are generally qualitative, yet each patient is subject to extensive individual follow up with longitudinal information incorporated in all decisions (tissue characterization, treatment planning and response evaluations). Contrary to this, advanced neuroimaging research studies are most commonly cross sectional, evaluating a statistical difference between involved groups or time points. To bridge this gap between clinical imaging practice and neuroimaging research is a core goal of the project which will lead to precision diagnostics.

 Core projects in the MMIV advanced neuroimaging project are:

Leif Oltedal shares tips on international collaborations in Nature

Leif Oltedal, PI of the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) advanced neuroimaging project, was recently interviewed by Nature and shared his top tips on building and maintaining international collaborations. Among other things, he describes how the GEMRIC...

Our methods aim at:

feature detection (i.e. novelty in data acquisition, reconstruction and visualization)

feature extraction (i.e. novelty in data modelling and quantification)

feature prediction (i.e. linking features across time and scales – combining advanced neuroimaging, patient history and various “omics” data while exploring novel approached in medical visualization).

Related Publications

 

2019

  • T. I. M. Aarsland, I. Leskauskaite, Ø. Midttun, A. Ulvik, P. M. Ueland, L. Oltedal, V. J. Erchinger, K. J. Ødegaard, J. Haavik, and U. Kessler, “The effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on serum tryptophan metabolites,” Brain Stimulation, 2019. doi:10.1016/j.brs.2019.05.018
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{aarsland2019effect,
      title={The effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on serum tryptophan metabolites},
      author={Aarsland, Tore Ivar Malmei and Leskauskaite, Ieva and Midttun, {\O}ivind and Ulvik, Arve and Ueland, Per Magne and Oltedal, Leif and Erchinger, Vera Jane and {\O}degaard, Ketil Joachim and Haavik, Jan and Kessler, Ute},
      journal={Brain Stimulation},
      year={2019},
      publisher={Elsevier},
      url = "https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1935861X19302256",
      doi = "10.1016/j.brs.2019.05.018",
    }

  • R. A. Karunamuni, N. S. White, A. Fromm, G. Moen, E. Renate Grüner, A. M. Dale, and L. Oltedal, “Improved characterization of cerebral infarction using combined tissue T2 and high b-value diffusion MRI in post-thrombectomy patients: a feasibility study,” Acta Radiologica, p. 284185118820063, 2019. doi:10.1177/0284185118820063
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{karunamuni2019improved,
      title={Improved characterization of cerebral infarction using combined tissue {T2} and high b-value diffusion {MRI} in post-thrombectomy patients: a feasibility study},
      author={Karunamuni, Roshan A and White, Nathan S and Fromm, Annette and Moen, Gunnar and Renate Gr{\"u}ner, Eli and Dale, Anders M and Oltedal, Leif},
      journal={Acta Radiologica},
      pages={0284185118820063},
      year={2019},
      publisher={SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England},
      url = "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0284185118820063",
      doi = "10.1177/0284185118820063",
    }

2018

  • L. Oltedal, K. L. Narr, C. Abbott, A. Anand, M. Argyelan, H. Bartsch, U. Dannlowski, A. Dols, P. van Eijndhoven, L. Emsell, V. J. Erchinger, R. Espinoza, T. Hahn, L. G. Hanson, G. Hellemann, M. B. Jorgensen, U. Kessler, M. L. Oudega, O. B. Paulson, R. Redlich, P. Sienaert, M. L. Stek, I. Tendolkar, M. Vandenbulcke, K. J. Oedegaard, and A. M. Dale, “Volume of the Human Hippocampus and Clinical Response Following Electroconvulsive Therapy,” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 84, iss. 8, pp. 574-581, 2018. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.05.017
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Hippocampal enlargements are commonly reported after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). To clarify mechanisms, we examined if ECT-induced hippocampal volume change relates to dose (number of ECT sessions and electrode placement) and acts as a biomarker of clinical outcome. Longitudinal neuroimaging and clinical data from 10 independent sites participating in the Global ECT-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) were obtained for mega-analysis. Hippocampal volumes were extracted from structural magnetic resonance images, acquired before and after patients (n = 281) experiencing a major depressive episode completed an ECT treatment series using right unilateral and bilateral stimulation. Untreated nondepressed control subjects (n = 95) were scanned twice. The number of ECT sessions and electrode placement impacts the extent and laterality of hippocampal enlargement, but volume change is not positively associated with clinical outcome. The results suggest that the high efficacy of ECT is not explained by hippocampal enlargement, which alone might not serve as a viable biomarker for treatment outcome.

    @article{Oltedal_BioPsych_2018,
    title = "Volume of the Human Hippocampus and Clinical Response Following Electroconvulsive Therapy",
    journal = "Biological Psychiatry",
    volume = "84",
    number = "8",
    pages = "574 - 581",
    year = "2018",
    note = "Cannabinoids, Ketamine, Connectivity, and Depression",
    issn = "0006-3223",
    doi = "10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.05.017",
    url = "http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006322318315348",
    author = "Leif Oltedal and Katherine L. Narr and Christopher Abbott and Amit Anand and Miklos Argyelan and Hauke Bartsch and Udo Dannlowski and Annemieke Dols and Philip van Eijndhoven and Louise Emsell and Vera Jane Erchinger and Randall Espinoza and Tim Hahn and Lars G. Hanson and Gerhard Hellemann and Martin Balslev Jorgensen and Ute Kessler and Mardien L. Oudega and Olaf B. Paulson and Ronny Redlich and Pascal Sienaert and Max L. Stek and Indira Tendolkar and Mathieu Vandenbulcke and Ketil J. Oedegaard and Anders M. Dale",
    abstract = {
    
    Hippocampal enlargements are commonly reported after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). To clarify mechanisms, we examined if ECT-induced hippocampal volume change relates to dose (number of ECT sessions and electrode placement) and acts as a biomarker of clinical outcome.
    
    Longitudinal neuroimaging and clinical data from 10 independent sites participating in the Global ECT-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) were obtained for mega-analysis. Hippocampal volumes were extracted from structural magnetic resonance images, acquired before and after patients (n = 281) experiencing a major depressive episode completed an ECT treatment series using right unilateral and bilateral stimulation. Untreated nondepressed control subjects (n = 95) were scanned twice.
    
    The number of ECT sessions and electrode placement impacts the extent and laterality of hippocampal enlargement, but volume change is not positively associated with clinical outcome. The results suggest that the high efficacy of ECT is not explained by hippocampal enlargement, which alone might not serve as a viable biomarker for treatment outcome.}
    }

2017

  • L. Oltedal, H. Bartsch, O. J. E. Sørhaug, U. Kessler, C. Abbott, A. Dols, M. L. Stek, L. Ersland, L. Emsell, P. van Eijndhoven, and others, “The Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC): Establishing a multi-site investigation of the neural mechanisms underlying response to electroconvulsive therapy,” NeuroImage: Clinical, vol. 14, pp. 422-432, 2017. doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2017.02.009
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{oltedal2017global,
      title={The Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC): Establishing a multi-site investigation of the neural mechanisms underlying response to electroconvulsive therapy},
      author={Oltedal, Leif and Bartsch, Hauke and S{\o}rhaug, Ole Johan Evjenth and Kessler, Ute and Abbott, Christopher and Dols, Annemieke and Stek, Max L and Ersland, Lars and Emsell, Louise and van Eijndhoven, Philip and others},
      journal={NeuroImage: Clinical},
      volume={14},
      pages={422--432},
      year={2017},
      publisher={Elsevier},
      url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213158217300438},
      doi = "10.1016/j.nicl.2017.02.009"  
    }