Publications

2018

  • M. Meuschke, N. N. Smit, N. Lichtenberg, B. Preim, and K. Lawonn, "Automatic Generation of Web-Based User Studies to Evaluate Depth Perception in Vascular Surface Visualizations," in Eurographics Workshop on Visual Computing for Biology and Medicine, 2018, pp. 33-44. doi:10.2312/vcbm.20181227
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    User studies are often required in biomedical visualization application papers in order to provide evidence for the utility of the presented approach. An important aspect is how well depth information can be perceived, as depth encoding is important to enable an understandable representation of complex data. Unfortunately, in practice there is often little time available to perform such studies, and setting up and conducting user studies may be labor-intensive. In addition, it can be challenging to reach enough participants to support the contribution claims of the paper. In this paper, we propose a system that allows biomedical visualization researchers to quickly generate perceptual task-based user studies for novel surface visualizations, and to perform the resulting experiment via a web interface. This approach helps to reduce effort in the setup of user studies themselves, and at the same time leverages a web-based approach that can help researchers attract more participants to their study. We demonstrate our system using the specific application of depth judgment tasks to evaluate vascular surface visualizations, since there is a lot of recent interest in this area. However, the system is also generally applicable for conducting other task-based user studies in biomedical visualization.

    @inproceedings{Meuschke_VCBM_2018,title = {{Automatic Generation of Web-Based User Studies to Evaluate Depth Perception in Vascular Surface Visualizations}},author = {Monique Meuschke and Noeska N. Smit and Nils Lichtenberg and Bernhard Preim and Kai Lawonn},pages = {033-044},DOI = {10.2312/vcbm.20181227},booktitle = {{Eurographics Workshop on Visual Computing for Biology and Medicine}},year = {2018},isbn = {978-3-03868-056-7},issn = {2070-5786},publisher = {Eurographics Association},editor = {Anna Puig Puig and Thomas Schultz and Anna Vilanova and Ingrid Hotz and Barbora Kozlikova and Pere-Pau Vázquez},url = {http://noeskasmit.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Meuschke_2018.pdf},abstract = {User studies are often required in biomedical visualization application papers in order to provide evidence for the utility of the presented approach. An important aspect is how well depth information can be perceived, as depth encoding is important to enable an understandable representation of complexdata. Unfortunately, in practice there is often little time available to perform such studies, and setting up and conducting user studies may be labor-intensive. In addition, it can be challenging to reach enough participants to support thecontribution claims of the paper.In this paper, we propose a system that allows biomedical visualization researchers to quickly generate perceptual task-based user studies for novel surface visualizations, and to perform the resulting experiment via a web interface. This approach helps to reduce effort in the setup of user studies themselves,and at the same time leverages a web-based approach that can help researchers attract more participants to their study. We demonstrate our system using the specific application of depth judgmenttasks to evaluate vascular surface visualizations, since there is a lot of recent interest in this area. However, the system is also generally applicable for conducting other task-baseduser studies in biomedical visualization.}}

  • L. Oltedal, K. L. Narr, C. Abbott, A. Anand, M. Argyelan, H. Bartsch, U. Dannlowski, A. Dols, P. van Eijndhoven, L. Emsell, V. J. Erchinger, R. Espinoza, T. Hahn, L. G. Hanson, G. Hellemann, M. B. Jorgensen, U. Kessler, M. L. Oudega, O. B. Paulson, R. Redlich, P. Sienaert, M. L. Stek, I. Tendolkar, M. Vandenbulcke, K. J. Oedegaard, and A. M. Dale, "Volume of the human hippocampus and clinical response following electroconvulsive therapy," Biological psychiatry, vol. 84, iss. 8, pp. 574-581, 2018. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.05.017
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Hippocampal enlargements are commonly reported after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). To clarify mechanisms, we examined if ECT-induced hippocampal volume change relates to dose (number of ECT sessions and electrode placement) and acts as a biomarker of clinical outcome. Longitudinal neuroimaging and clinical data from 10 independent sites participating in the Global ECT-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) were obtained for mega-analysis. Hippocampal volumes were extracted from structural magnetic resonance images, acquired before and after patients (n = 281) experiencing a major depressive episode completed an ECT treatment series using right unilateral and bilateral stimulation. Untreated nondepressed control subjects (n = 95) were scanned twice. The number of ECT sessions and electrode placement impacts the extent and laterality of hippocampal enlargement, but volume change is not positively associated with clinical outcome. The results suggest that the high efficacy of ECT is not explained by hippocampal enlargement, which alone might not serve as a viable biomarker for treatment outcome.

    @article{Oltedal_BioPsych_2018,title = "Volume of the Human Hippocampus and Clinical Response Following Electroconvulsive Therapy",journal = "Biological Psychiatry",volume = "84",number = "8",pages = "574 - 581",year = "2018",note = "Cannabinoids, Ketamine, Connectivity, and Depression",issn = "0006-3223",doi = "10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.05.017",url = "http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006322318315348",author = "Leif Oltedal and Katherine L. Narr and Christopher Abbott and Amit Anand and Miklos Argyelan and Hauke Bartsch and Udo Dannlowski and Annemieke Dols and Philip van Eijndhoven and Louise Emsell and Vera Jane Erchinger and Randall Espinoza and Tim Hahn and Lars G. Hanson and Gerhard Hellemann and Martin Balslev Jorgensen and Ute Kessler and Mardien L. Oudega and Olaf B. Paulson and Ronny Redlich and Pascal Sienaert and Max L. Stek and Indira Tendolkar and Mathieu Vandenbulcke and Ketil J. Oedegaard and Anders M. Dale",abstract = {Hippocampal enlargements are commonly reported after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). To clarify mechanisms, we examined if ECT-induced hippocampal volume change relates to dose (number of ECT sessions and electrode placement) and acts as a biomarker of clinical outcome.Longitudinal neuroimaging and clinical data from 10 independent sites participating in the Global ECT-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) were obtained for mega-analysis. Hippocampal volumes were extracted from structural magnetic resonance images, acquired before and after patients (n = 281) experiencing a major depressive episode completed an ECT treatment series using right unilateral and bilateral stimulation. Untreated nondepressed control subjects (n = 95) were scanned twice.The number of ECT sessions and electrode placement impacts the extent and laterality of hippocampal enlargement, but volume change is not positively associated with clinical outcome. The results suggest that the high efficacy of ECT is not explained by hippocampal enlargement, which alone might not serve as a viable biomarker for treatment outcome.}}